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Sara Bernard

Multimedia Journalist

Seattle, WA; San Francisco, CA

Sara Bernard

Writer, radio reporter, photographer, globetrotter

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These Rainier Vista Kids Will Melt You With Cuteness (And May Save Their Neighborhood)

Suwayda Jimale got the idea for the "G.O.O.D Girls" way back in third grade. “I came up with the idea because I wanted to help with the neighborhood,” she says matter-of-factly, swinging her tiny legs as they dangle a foot off the ground from a bench in Rainier Vista’s Central Park. “I came up with ‘G.O.O.D.
Seattle Weekly Link to Story
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In Georgetown, the Housing Is Affordable and the Air Unbreathable

In early 2015, Kelly Welker began to notice that the gritty air she was accustomed to breathing near her home on Flora Avenue South, in Georgetown, was grittier than usual. Within a few minutes of leaving her house, it would get into her eyes and burn. It would get into her sinuses and burn. It began searing her throat and coating her tongue, leaving a chalky, metallic aftertaste.
Seattle Weekly Link to Story
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Tent cities: Seattle’s unusual approach to homelessness

Asa Yoe is a mild-mannered 30-year-old with boyish features and warm eyes. He’s from Georgia, speaks with a gentle, Southern twang, and usually has a cigarette hanging from the corner of his mouth. He makes good money fishing in Alaska every summer, then heads south every fall to pick up the odd construction job.
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Summer Guide 2015: Where to Find Glowing Algae in Puget Sound

I think my obsession started back in college, when a roommate who’d spent a semester in Costa Rica first described the glowing emerald footprints she could make on the beach. Or maybe it was when another friend mentioned the time off the coast of Vieques, Puerto Rico, when rivers of liquid sapphire trailed his boat like so many emptied glow sticks.
Seattle Weekly Link to Story
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The Cost of Clean Coal

Barbara Correro was at home drinking tea, reading the paper. She had spent the past five years and most of her savings on a long-cherished retirement dream: a small mobile home on 24 acres of pine and hardwood forest, a large organic garden, and a pack of friendly dogs in rural Kemper County, Miss.
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Tent cities: Seattle’s unique approach to homelessness

Asa Yoe is a mild-mannered 30-year-old with boyish features and warm eyes. He’s from Georgia, speaks with a gentle, Southern twang, and usually has a cigarette hanging from the corner of his mouth. He makes good money fishing in Alaska every summer, then heads south every fall to pick up the odd construction job.
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We did the math on clean coal, and it doesn’t add up

The Kemper County energy facility in rural Mississippi is a technological wonder: Among other things, it’s the first coal-fired power plant in the United States designed to capture its carbon emissions. But as I discovered during a months-long investigation of the plant, some aspects are less than wondrous.
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South Seattle Residents Complain of Industrial Dust

Kelly Welker knew Seattle’s Georgetown area was an industrial neighborhood when she moved here nine years ago. The air quality isn’t great. But lately, she says, it’s been getting worse. “I had never experienced going outside of my house and having my eyes burn within a couple of minutes,” Welker said.
Oregon Public Broadcasting Link to Story
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Why Have Seattle's Urban Forests Dodged Development?

“With so much building going on in Seattle, why haven’t urban forests like Interlaken and Ravenna been developed?”. Adam Goch of Greenwood asked that question as part of KUOW’s Local Wonder project. With all the construction going on, it’s no wonder that Adam Goch of Greenwood worries about the city’s green spaces.
kuow.org Link to Story
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Why Seattle still has a huge garbage problem

It’s a warm Monday afternoon at Seattle’s South Transfer Station – a newly renovated, LEED-Gold certified dump. The self-haul sorting signs are clear, the waste piles are neatly organized, and the place is, quite frankly, gleaming. But for operations manager Suzanne Hildreth, things are looking a little bit too clean.
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Rape Culture in the Alaskan Wilderness

One night a few years ago, when Geneva was 13, a man she’d grown up with stumbled into the room she shared with her two sisters in Tanana, Alaska, a tiny village northwest of Fairbanks, and climbed on top of her. He was stumbling drunk and aggressive. “He tried getting into my clothes,” she recalls.
The Atlantic Link to Story
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Seattle Suspends $1 Fine For Failure To Compost

Breathe easy, Seattle. The proposed fines for not following Seattle’s new food composting rule have been delayed. The fines were originally scheduled to start July 1. But on Wednesday, Mayor Ed Murray said he would suspend those fines for the rest of the year. The earliest they could go into effect -- and that's a big if -- is January 2016.
kuow.org Link to Story

About

Sara Bernard

I'm a former staff writer and multimedia producer for Edutopia magazine, a recent fellow at Grist.org, freelance journalist, and avid international traveler. I grew up in upstate New York and the San Francisco Bay Area, studied abroad in Toulouse, France, and spent several years freelancing, traveling, and volunteering in Thailand, Vietnam, India, France, England, Peru, Ecuador, Haiti, and Nicaragua before obtaining a master's degree at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism.

As a writer, photographer, radio reporter, and Web producer, I've fallen pretty hard for the myriad possibilities of multimedia storytelling. I spent a year reporting part-time for Crosscurrents on KALW 91.7 FM in San Francisco and a summer reporting for the Alaska Public Radio Network. I've produced radio pieces for broadcast on KQED’s The California Report, KUOW in Seattle, the National Radio Project’s Making Contact, and KALX 90.7 FM in Berkeley, along with many audio slide shows for news outlets and nonprofit organizations. I've shot and edited Web videos, mapped data, and built stories using a variety of software platforms and CMS systems including Creatavist, Drupal, and Wordpress.

In addition to Edutopia, I've written for Grist, Wired, TheAtlantic.com, VIA, Bay Nature, Afar, Ode, Yoga Journal, Adirondack Life, Change.org, KQED’s MindShift, and The Bold Italic, among other publications, about education, travel, food, health, science, art, social justice, and the environment. I'm passionate about the power of high-integrity media to inform and inspire… and intensely curious about pretty much everything.